/Inside the restoration efforts at Notre Dame cathedral

Inside the restoration efforts at Notre Dame cathedral

New photos from inside the Notre Dame cathedral show the daunting task ahead to restore the 800-year-old Gothic Cathedral.

Huge mountains of rubble and beams from the charred spire remain where they fell one month after fire destroyed the roof of the beloved Paris monument on April 15, while sunlight streams in through massive holes where a roof used to be.

Giant nets have been installed to catch falling debris and protect workers using robots to the remove rubble which will be examined by police seeking clues about how the fire began.

French Culture Minister Franck Riester on Wednesday said the building was still being made safe enough for restoration work to begin.

Wearing hard hats, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was given a tour of the scene on Wednesday alongside Riester and Notre Dame cathedral rector Patrick Chauvet, who appeared grief-stricken as he surveyed the damage.

FRANCE-CANADA-NOTRE-DAME-FIRE-POLITICS-DIPLOMACY

French chief architect of Historical Sites Philippe Villeneuve (R) speaks to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (C) and Notre Dame cathedral rector Patrick Chauvet as they visit the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris on May 15, 2019, after it sustained major fire damage the previous month.

AFP/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits Notre Dame de Paris

A worker stands on scaffolding near to damage and rubble in the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral during preliminary work.

EPA

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits Notre Dame de Paris

A protective net in the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral during preliminary work.

EPA

France Notre Dame Fire

French Culture Minister Franck Riester says that one month after a fire engulfed Notre Dame Cathedral, the edifice is still being made safe enough for restoration to begin.

AP

A picture shows damaged chairs and rubbles during the preliminary work in the Notre-Dame Cathedral one month after it sustained major fire damage in Paris

Damaged chairs and rubble in the Notre-Dame Cathedral one month after it sustained major fire damage in Paris, France.

Reuters

The cathedral — which was visited by up to 14 million people a year — remains closed and under police guard.

Trudeau was one of the first officials allowed to see inside the site and told Associated Press he wanted to show Canadians’ solidarity “toward our French cousins.”

Workers must wear protective suits and masks and regularly take blood tests to test lead exposure after 400 tones of the toxic material was melted in the blaze, ABC News reported.

Lead levels at the site were between 32 and 65 times the recommended limit by French health authorities in the days after the fire.

Fundraising efforts to rebuild the church, which was undergoing much-needed renovations at the time of the blaze, have topped $1 billion.

French President Emmanuel Macron promised that the cathedral would be rebuilt within five years but architects told the LA Times it may take decades.

French investigators believe an electrical short-circuit was most likely behind the massive blaze.