/CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies

CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies

Alice Rivlin

Alice Rivlin, the founding director of the Congressional Budget Office, also served as the director of the Office of Management and Budget during the Clinton administration and as vice chair of the Federal Reserve Board. | Matt Rourke/AP Photo

Congress

05/14/2019 03:41 PM EDT

Updated 05/14/2019 04:57 PM EDT


Alice Rivlin, the founding director of the Congressional Budget Office, has died. She was 88 years old.

Rivlin was appointed to CBO in 1975 and holds the record for the longest tenure in that post, until 1983.She served as a staunch advocate for the independence of the agency, which conducts nonpartisan analysis of budget and economic issues in connection with the congressional budget process.

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She was most recently a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, where she worked on economic studies and health policy.

Rivlin also served as the director of the Office of Management and Budget during the Clinton administration and as vice chair of the Federal Reserve Board. She led the financial control board created by Congress in 1995 to steer the District of Columbia out of a financial crisis.

In 2010, President Barack Obama named Rivlin to the Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, a bipartisan commission devoted to deficit reduction.

In a statement, CBO Director Keith Hall said Rivlin “forged a commitment to providing objective, nonpartisan information to help the Congress make effective budget and economic policy.”

“Her commitment to high-quality analysis, well thought out and clearly presented, continues to be a guiding principle of CBO,” Hall said.

In a post recognizing her legacy, Brookings noted that Rivlin has held senior positions in three presidential administrations.

“The Library of Congress has cataloged more than 10,000 items related to her tenure in government service,” Brookings wrote on Tuesday. “Rivlin’s expertise and skills — and her unique ability to build bridges across political parties — played key roles in the formation of U.S. economic policy for more than half a century.“

House Budget Chairman John Yarmuth (D-Ky.) called Rivlin “one of the foremost leaders of the budget world who had the respect and admiration of Democrats and Republicans alike.”

“Her vision and leadership made the Congressional Budget Office into the vital resource it is today, and her contributions will continue to help frame our debates for years to come,” he said in a statement.

Rivlin also served on the board of the nonprofit Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

In a statement, CRFB said Rivlin’s “knowledge as a budget scholar is irreplaceable.“